Frida Kahlo, Animated Portrait

April 24, 2016 § Leave a comment

An inspired animation of Frida Kahlo’s famous portrait that was taken by her father, Guillermo Kahlo, in 1932 .  The animation incorporates key images from her works that also defined her life as she depicted it on canvas.  I had to have it.

Frida Kahlo, animated portrait
Frida Kahlo, animated portrait

 

via GIPHY

Frida Kahlo Bio as Artist

“Mexican fantasy painter known as much for her turbulent personal life as her fanciful self-portraits. Kahlo learned to paint in 1925 after recovering from a debilitating bus accident that left her unable to bear children. The tragedy was often the subject of her paintings and was an integral part of her personal imagery. Her work can be seen as the product of a kind of exorcism by which she projected her anguish on to another Frida, in order to free herself from pain and at the same time maintain a hold of reality. Small in scale, primitive in style, and bold in color, the artist is sometimes shown as an animal, such a deer, which have lead artists and critics alike to label her work Surrealist. The artist eschewed this, maintaining that she painted images from her own life, not dreams. Also the subject of several works was her tumultuous marriage to artist Diego Rivera. One portrait shows the artist as a tiny figure in traditional Mexican dress, dwarfed in size by the large, brooding Rivera. In 1953, Kahlo’s leg was amputated at the knee due to gangrene. She subsequently turned to drugs and alcohol to relieve her suffering. She died almost certainly by suicide in 1954. Her work received notoriety in the 1970’s, becoming popular with feminist art historians and Latin Americans living in the United States” – via MoMA

 

Masterpieces

Frida Kahlo spent the majority of her life confined to a bed and in physical pain.  She painted her small world in graphic and sometimes gruesome detail.  Her work was and still is labeled as Surrealism, which she strongly rejected.  So, I applied another label I found, Magic Realism.  The first painting, below, is her first of many future self-portraits.  The bottom 3 paintings represent some of her greatest works.  All of the images are Courtesy of www.FridaKahlo.org.

Self-Portrait in a Velvet Dress, 1926 by Frida Kahlo. Her first self-portrait. Courtesy of http://www.FridaKahlo.org

 

Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird, 1940 by Frida Kahlo. Courtesy of http://www.FridaKahlo.org

 

Roots, 1943 by Frida Kahlo. Courtesy of http://www.FridaKahlo.org

 

The Broken Column, 1944 by Frida Kahlo. Courtesy of http://www.FridaKahlo.org

 

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Frida Kahlo, Animated Portrait was originally published on Field Grass

Animated Short by Salvador Dali and Walt Disney

February 20, 2016 § Leave a comment

 

Destino

An animated collaboration between Salvador Dali and  Walt Disney.  1946.

 

Salvador_Dali_and_Walt_Disney_362_236.jpg

Animated Short by Salvador Dali and Walt Disney was originally published on Field Grass

His Day is Done by Maya Angelou

December 11, 2013 § Leave a comment

This is the official tribute of Nelson Mandela from the American people at the time of his death.  An amazing poem.  Beautiful and serene, read by Maya Angelou who has a captivating voice.  I highly recommend that you take a few minutes to listen.  Reading is optional.  A poem by Dr. Maya Angelou, from the U.S. Department of State.

His day is done.
Is done.
The news came on the wings of a wind, reluctant to carry its burden…

Maya Angelou

Angelou’s life has certainly been a full one: from the hardscrabble Depression era South to pimp, prostitute, supper-club chanteuse, performer in Porgy and Bess, coordinator for Martin Luther King Jr.’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference, journalist in Egypt and Ghana in the heady days of decolonization, comrade of Malcolm X, eyewitness to the Watts riots. She knew King and Malcolm, Billie Holiday and Abbey Lincoln.

– Reviewer John McWhorter, The New Republic

As poet laureate Angelou recited her poem “On the Pulse of Morning” at President Bill Clinton’s inauguration, the first poet to make an inaugural recitation since Robert Frost at John F. Kennedy’s inauguration in 1961. She has received dozens of awards and over thirty honorary doctoral degrees.


 

His day is done.
Is done.
The news came on the wings of a wind, reluctant to carry its burden.
Nelson Mandela’s day is done.
The news, expected and still unwelcome, reached us in the United States, and suddenly our world became somber.
Our skies were leadened.

His day is done.
We see you, South African people standing speechless at the slamming of that final door through which no traveler returns.
Our spirits reach out to you Bantu, Zulu, Xhosa, Boer.
We think of you and your son of Africa, your father, your one more wonder of the world.

We send our souls to you as you reflect upon your David armed with a mere stone, facing down the mighty Goliath.

Your man of strength, Gideon, emerging triumphant.

Although born into the brutal embrace of Apartheid, scarred by the savage atmosphere of racism, unjustly imprisoned in the bloody maws of South African dungeons.

Would the man survive? Could the man survive?

His answer strengthened men and women around the world.

In the Alamo, in San Antonio, Texas, on the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, in Chicago’s Loop, in New Orleans Mardi Gras, in New York City’s Times Square, we watched as the hope of Africa sprang through the prison’s doors.

His stupendous heart intact, his gargantuan will hale and hearty.

He had not been crippled by brutes, nor was his passion for the rights of human beings diminished by twenty-seven years of imprisonment.

Even here in America, we felt the cool, refreshing breeze of freedom.

When Nelson Mandela took the seat of Presidency in his country where formerly he was not even allowed to vote we were enlarged by tears of pride, as we saw Nelson Mandela’s former prison guards invited, courteously, by him to watch from the front rows his inauguration.

We saw him accept the world’s award in Norway with the grace and gratitude of the Solon in Ancient Roman Courts, and the confidence of African Chiefs from ancient royal stools.

No sun outlasts its sunset, but it will rise again and bring the dawn.

Yes, Mandela’s day is done, yet we, his inheritors, will open the gates wider for reconciliation, and we will respond generously to the cries of Blacks and Whites, Asians, Hispanics, the poor who live piteously on the floor of our planet.

He has offered us understanding.
We will not withhold forgiveness even from those who do not ask.
Nelson Mandela’s day is done, we confess it in tearful voices, yet we lift our own to say thank you.

Thank you our Gideon, thank you our David, our great courageous man.

We will not forget you, we will not dishonor you, we will remember and be glad that you lived among us, that you taught us, and that you loved us all.

– Maya Angelou

 

His Day is Done by Maya Angelou was originally published on FieldGrass

Miles Davis mind candy

November 24, 2013 § Leave a comment

I do like Miles Davis and have seen him in concert.  I am not a Jazz person.  I know nothing and rarely listen.  This is satisfying mind candy.  An animation of the notes of So What.  I dig it big time.

 

220px-miles_davis_by_palumboWidely considered one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century, Miles Davis was, with his musical groups, at the forefront of several major developments in jazz music, including bebopcool jazzhard bopmodal jazz, and jazz fusion.  – Miles Davis wiki

Miles Davis mind candy was originally published on Kept

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