Gojira

November 4, 2014 § Leave a comment

“Godzilla does not feel emotion…Godzilla is emotion”

I imagine that you find this ridiculous.  Far from it.  This documentary from the BBC begins with the birth of the Godzilla phenomenon as an embodiment of the collective  anxiety, helplessness and rage of the Japanese people after WWII.  As they fell prey to the American atomic program in Hiroshima, Nagasaki and the subsequent atomic tests in the Pacific rim.   Japanese adults and older, speaking with quiet gravitas about Godzilla.   It is an important piece of history from a bizarre perspective, and culturally quite significant.

You may, like I did, already know all that about Godzilla.  It is different, and profound, to hear it  from these people.

Gojira was originally published on FieldGrass

Medieval Sephardic Music | performance

September 29, 2014 § Leave a comment

Medieval Jewish music of  Spain.  Beautiful.

Exotic to our ears, ethereal and rhythmic.


Above is a long playlist of 26 pieces of Spanish Sephardic music.  The first performances are by “Ensemble Fontegara”.  They are period pieces featured at the beginning of the playlist.  I have not listened to the entire list, I love their work.  It inspired me to write this post.


 Music History

Sepharad refers to the descendants of the Jews from the Iberian Peninsula.  Sepharad is a Hebrew word meaning ‘Spain’.

blogmedia-medieval-sepharadi-spain-jpg.jpg

Medieval Sephardi with period instruments in Spain.

Sephardic music has its roots in the musical traditions of the Jewish communities in medieval Spain.  Since then, it has picked up influences from Morocco, Argentina, Turkey, Greece, and the other places that Spanish Jews settled after their expulsion from Spain in 1492.  Much of the original music has been lost.  Lyrics were preserved by communities formed by the Jews expelled from the Iberian Peninsula.  These Sephardic communities share many of the same lyrics and poems, but the music itself varies considerably.

Medieval period instruments in Casa de Sefarad, Spain

Medieval period instruments in Casa de Sefarad, Spain

Sephardic music has evolved over centuries as it incorporated local instruments, sounds and rhythms into the genre.  What we find is a wide variation of musical styles united by common lyrics. Sephardic music, including pan-Sephardic music which may not necessarily be Judeo-Spanish, is primarily vocal. Instruments, when they are used, are played to accompany songs. Instrumental practice among Sephardim has generally reflected that of the host culture.

The tradition of Jewish liturgical chant dates back to Biblical era. But the profane Jewish singing acquired its breadth and diversity in the Diaspora, through the cultural and musical influence of the various cultures with which the Jewish communities were -willingly or by force- in contact. Just as poetry, Sephardic music remained the privileged witness of the strange adventure of the Jews from the Iberian Peninsula who successively underwent tolerance, success, persecution and deportation. In spite of dispersion and acculturation, Jews have preserved their language and specific cultural values.

sources – from:

wiki
http://borzykowski.users.ch/EnglMCPalavrikas.htm

 


Explore the Music Online

  • Sephardic Music: A Century of Recordings

“This website showcases over 100 years of recorded Sephardic music, from the 78 rpm era to the present. It first explores in detail the earliest Sephardic recordings, the artists that made them, and their repertory and performance practices. These early recordings tell a rich story of Sephardic musical life in the first half of the 20th century. The site next covers the second half-century of recorded Sephardic music, touching on the amazing outpouring of Sephardic recordings and the diverse performing styles used in these recordings.”

 http://www.sephardicmusic.org/index.htm  The history and various types of Sephardic music.

Desire to Share.   http://www.desiretoshare.com/music/  Online samples of a variety of regional Sephardic music (note, music starts playing when the page loads)

  • Sephardic Music Festival  http://sephardicmusicfestival.com/  This showcases the modern influences and evolution of Sephardic music.  They also have free downloads.

 

Note:  I removed the Historical Notes, Architecture and Religious Art sections to create a separate post.

//

Medieval Sephardic Music | performance was originally published on Kept

Cha Qu 茶趣: How water affects the taste of tea

September 9, 2014 § Leave a comment

Chinese see everything in the world as a manifestation of either a male or female principle. For example, water is female, which means tea must be male. A funny thing is that when a boy chases or flirts with a girl, it is called “to brew – pao 泡” in Chinese. Well, if water is female, this means a…

Cha Qu 茶趣: How water affects the taste of tea was originally published on Things I Should See

This Moment

September 1, 2014 § Leave a comment

“Drink your tea slowly and reverently, as if it is the axis on which the earth revolves – slowly, evenly, without rushing toward the future…”

read the rest of the quote/post and about:

Thich Nhat Hanh, now in his 88th year, is a gentle, humble monk – the man Martin Luther King called “An Apostle of peace and nonviolence.”

On my website: http://toni-two.com/blog/2014/08/29/this-moment/ | things I should see

Whitman in color

August 20, 2014 § Leave a comment

A stunning piece.   A colorized portrait of Walt Whitmanm.   So well done, long surpassing the pink color of past works.   Very life-like, especially the transparent blue of his eyes

view image on my site…http://toni-two.com/blog/2014/08/20/whitman-in-color/

 

Whitman in color

August 20, 2014 § Leave a comment

  A stunning piece.   A colorized portrait of Walt Whitman.   So well done, long surpassing the pink color of past works.   Very life-like, especially the transparent blue of his eyes.     by artist Dana Keller Related articles Colorized Photos That Bring Walt Whitman, Charlie Chaplin, Helen Keller & Mark Twain Back…

Whitman in color was originally published on FieldGrass

Frank Lloyd Wright master work

August 17, 2014 § Leave a comment

Spectacular, sweeping, graphic animation tour of the house in Fallingwater over Bear Run  organically emerging from the ground to form a beautifully completed structure and a visual tour.

Read more at: http://toni-two.com/blog/2014/08/17/frank-lloyd-wright-master-work/ | things I should see

Frank Lloyd Wright master work

August 17, 2014 § Leave a comment

Spectacular, sweeping, graphic animation tour of the house in Fallingwater over Bear Run  organically emerging from the ground to form a beautifully completed structure and a visual tour.   Fallingwater over Bear Run. The Kaufmann House. Commissioned and designed in 1935.       share

Frank Lloyd Wright master work was originally published on Things I Should See

farewell great lady

May 28, 2014 § 1 Comment

We celebrate Maya Angelou’s life, cherish her wisdom, and learn from her words.  But we will do so without her now.

Maya_Angelou_1954_performance

Maya Angelou 1954

 

“Listen to yourself and in that quietude you might hear the voice of God,” she wrote in the most recent post on her @DrMayaAngelou Twitter account on May 23.

Read more…http://toni-two.com/blog/2014/05/28/farewell-great-lady/

farewell great lady

May 28, 2014 § Leave a comment

We celebrate Maya Angelou’s life, cherish her wisdom, and learn from her words.  But we will do so without her now, 28 May, 2014.   “Listen to yourself and in that quietude you might hear the voice of God,” she wrote in the most recent post on her @DrMayaAngelou Twitter account on May 23.   from…

farewell great lady was originally published on Things I Should See

Posts are on my site – toni-two.com

May 16, 2014 § Leave a comment

 

Update August 2014:  New site is up!

“things I should see” at toni-two.com

You have created the final curse with your own words!  Obey the will of god, see toni-two.com, or sufer.

“You have created the final curse with your own words!  Obey the will of god, let my people to toni-two.com, or suffer the consequences.”

Vatican Master Painters

May 16, 2014 § Leave a comment

My latest acquisition…A book by Anja Grebe celebrates the stunning art collection of the Vatican by featuring every Old Master painting on display. “The Vatican: All The Paintings” also includes images of sculptures, maps, and tapestries which span centuries of artistic genius.

Read more at my full blog post: http://toni-two.com/2014/04/05/vatican-paintings-a-book/ | Things I should see

 

Pietro Perugino: Pinacoteca, Sala VII, Madonna and Child with Saints

soaring steppes – preview

May 15, 2014 § Leave a comment

 

There has been a boom in the interest and exposure of Mongolian golden eagle hunters.  I too find it exciting, and extremely cool.  So I have collected some images for me to keep and share – if you are liked minded.


Read and view more stunning photos at my full blog post: http://toni-two.com/wp/blog/2014/04/19/soaring-steppes/ | Things I should see

Landscape With The Fall of Icarus

April 19, 2014 § Leave a comment

I came across this poem and it struck a chord.  I did not know that it is a well-known piece.  Still, it struck me and I was amused.  Perhaps not the proper reaction, if there be such a thing – I laughed.  Then felt bad about it.  A bit.

Landscape With The Fall of Icarus

According to Brueghel
when Icarus fell
it was spring

a farmer was ploughing
his field
the whole pageantry

of the year was
awake tingling
near

the edge of the sea
concerned
with itself

sweating in the sun
that melted
the wings’ wax

unsignificantly
off the coast
there was

a splash quite unnoticed
this was
Icarus drowning

– William Carlos Williams

 

Discussion

by David W. Cole  Modern American Poetry

William Carlos Williams ends his poem with these lines:

a splash quite unnoticed this was Icarus drowning

He had begun it with an appeal to his authority, Brueghel, before going on to describe The Fall of Icarus in detail: the farmer doing his plowing, the awakening of spring, the self absorption of life at the edge of the sea, and the small detail of Icarus’s fast disappearing legs. A crucial aspect of Brueghel’s painting is its perspective.  The landscape and the action are seen from above– from the viewpoint, in other words, of Daedalus. The force of the picture is thus, I think, to move the viewer not only to recognize the unconcern for catastrophe inherent in the preoccupation of ongoing life, but also to register a horrified protest that it should be so. Perspective allows the painter to make this protest.  How is the poet to do it?

 

Williams does not dwell on the images of the poem… The matter-of-fact language, the absence of any punctuation (which I take to indicate an absence of expressive inflection), and of course the explicit assertion of the event’s insignificance, all work to understate, if not undercut, the pathos of Icarus’s headlong plunge to death. And yet the last words of the poem are “Icarus drowning.” The words resonate, and the splash is not quite unnoticed. The reader is forced to take notice, forced paradoxically not only to see but to feel the painful irony of death in the midst of life. Williams’s remarkable, forceful understatement brilliantly captures the protest expressed through the perspective of Brueghel’s painting.

from The Explicator 58.3 (Spring 2000)

Note about the painting:
Landscape with the Fall of Icarus, Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium, now seen as a good early copy of Bruegel’s original

Landscape With The Fall of Icarus was originally published on Things I Keep

soaring Steppes

April 19, 2014 § Leave a comment

There has been a boom in the interest and exposure of Mongolian golden eagle hunters.  I too find it exciting, and extremely cool.  I found some truly outstanding portraits.  So I have collected some images for me to keep and share – The Eagle Hunters segment. The Eagles The golden eagle is huge.  Eagles are huge.…

soaring Steppes was originally published on Things I Should See

"Today is a good day to die" redefined

April 14, 2014 § Leave a comment

There is a well-known misquote of Crazy Horse: “Today is a good day to die.” As such, it seems a grand statement of heroic, selfless, sacrifice in the face of an impossible feat, one from which you will likely not return. Stoic machismo. A fearless slap in the face for Death. I admit it appeals to me. Crazy Horse’s actual words translate into English as…
Read More…

"Today is a good day to die" redefined was originally published on FieldGrass

Photography by Nick Brandt

April 13, 2014 § Leave a comment

Nick Brandt is a photographer who photographs exclusively in Africa, one of his goals being to record a last testament to the wild animals and places there before they are destroyed by the hands of man.

The photograph below is the one that first caught my attention.  A well-crafted and powerful image.  You can feel the desperation and emptiness left by the elephant’s untimely demise in the ranger’s heart.  A moment mirrored by dense low-lying clouds over a vast, barren, landscape.

 

Ranger with Tusks of Elephant Killed At the Hands of Man, Amboseli 2011

Nick_Brandt_ranger_with_tusks

 

 

 Lion Couple, Serengeti 2010

Lion Couple, Serengeti 2010

 

 

Lion Roar, Maasai Mara, 2012 by Nick Brandt

Nick_Brandt_lion_roar

 

 

 Elephants Walking Through Grass, Amboseli 2008

Nick_Brandt_elephants_walking

 

 

 

Elephant Mother & Baby Sleeping, Amboseli 2012

Nick_Brandt_sleeping_baby

 

 

 Elephant Skull, Amboseli 2010

Nick_Brandt_elephant-skull

 

 

 Abandoned Ostrich Egg, Amboseli 2007

Nick_Brandt_abandonned_ostrich_egg

An abandoned ostrich egg sits alone, forgotten, in a dry wasteland.   A bleak metaphor of the future for Africa’s wildlife without more protection.

http://www.nickbrandt.com/Category.cfm
Nick Brandt Wikipedia

Photography by Nick Brandt was originally published on FieldGrass

Photography by Hussain Khalaf

April 8, 2014 § 2 Comments

Outstanding work by Bahraini photographer Hussain Khalaf.

Red by Hussain Khalaf

 

 

Ramadan Karim by Hussain Khalaf

 

 

14Feb Bahrain by Hussain Khalaf

 

 

Let me help by hjmk / Hussain Khalaf

 

 

Ready to Die for Bahrain by Hussain Khalaf

 

 

V for Victory by Hussain Khalaf

 

 

Play time by Hussain Khalaf

 

 

Bahraini Somood by Hussain Khalaf

 

 

Mistrust look by Hussain Khalaf

 

 

He is a freelance photographer whose work is on display, and for sale at 500px.

Hussain Khalaf 500px

hjmk / Hussain Khalaf

Photography by Hussain Khalaf was originally published on Kept

Smooth | Alexander Boden

April 3, 2014 § Leave a comment

by Alexander Boden

 

see more

Smooth | Alexander Boden was originally published on Things I Should See

Happy Valentine’s Day

February 14, 2014 Comments Off on Happy Valentine’s Day

NASA_sunHeart

Credit: NASA SDO via From Quarks to Quasars, Feb2014

Happy Valentine’s Day was originally published on FieldGrass

Angela Davis 1973

February 4, 2014 Comments Off on Angela Davis 1973

Great portrait.  A gorgeous, powerful, image.

angela_davis_1973_philipe_halsman

Angela Davis, 1973, Philippe Halsman/Magnum Photos

 

A late celebration of her birthday, January 26 1944.

 

 

Angela Davis 1973 was originally published on FieldGrass

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